Spring on the Chesapeake Bay

April is one of the best times of the year to get out on the water in Virginia. The weather is cool, the bugs are not out yet, and it doesn’t feel like a tropical rainforest. We used this opportunity to head east to where the mouth of the piankatank river opens to the mighty Chesapeake Bay. We brought out the ol prospector to hit the salty waters. This was our son’s first time at the beach also sitting in a canoe. He’s still a little too young to get out on the water but he was certainly excited to to get inside the canoe. The blue crabs don’t seem to be out and about yet, but we are getting the pots ready for May. It may also be possible to raise some oysters in these waters as well.This particularly area looks promising for all sorts of fishing. We spent the day, helping my father in law extend his deck, fishing and paddling. Although we didn’t catch anything, it was great to be outdoors, feel the breeze, warm in the sun and hunch over a small fire on the beach.

Chesapeake Bay

I was able to finally take my drone out for its first flight. My in-laws got me a Parrot Anafi drone for christmas, and 4 months later I was able to take it out of the box and take it for a test flight. I don’t know much about drones, but this thing is awesome. It shoots in 4k and would help take movie making to a whole new level. Hopefully I’ll be able to take it some canoe trips in the near future up north. I’m planning to take 2.5 months off at the end of my residency to spend more time with the family and go on some trips. With only 2 more months of training left to go, I find it hard to focus because of the prospect of finally finishing.

The trouble now is deciding where to go with an 18 month old. He’s too young for a backcountry canoe trip although I’ve heard of people tripping with toddlers. One potential is trekking out to Utah to visit the major 5 national parks. Another option is somewhere in western canada for a couple of weeks. Whatever we come up with, I’ll be excited to be away from the hospital. Let the countdown begin….

His first beach fire with his uncle.

New beginnings on the Chesapeake Bay

We explored the lands of my father’s cottage at the opening of the Chesapeake Bay. It has always been his dream to build a cottage and a retreat for all of his kids and grandkids to enjoy. Our quick survey of the land was promising; the area was teeming with wildlife. From herons, egrets and hawks to oysters and of course the Chesapeake blue crab. Back in the 1600s, the blue crab was a crucial source of food for Native Americans and European settlers in the Chesapeake Bay area. Today, this crustacean is an icon of the Chesapeake Bay region and their success in these waters have allowed numerous restaurants and businesses to thrive in the Virginia and Maryland. I don’t know much about trapping crabs, but it’s time to get out there and learn. Maybe even learn to raise some oysters along the way….

An early snow

December 9, 2018 – We were hit with an early and unexpected snowstorm, accumulating over 13 inches in Richmond, Virginia. This is certainly an early start to the snow season for us and much heavier than in the past. After a review of the Richmond weather records dating back to 1897, the heaviest snow that occurred earlier than Dec 10 was 7.3 inches on Nov 6-7, 1953. The record for December snowstorm for Richmond was 17.2 inches on Dec 22-23, 1908. Stay safe out there.

Patagonian horses

I’ve always liked this photo for some reason. Even though the framing of the shot is not perfect, I still like the landscape painted by the different colors of horses. I took this photo back in 2016 in Patagonia (Chilean side). I noticed that the horse manes are cut to different lengths. I speculate that this has to do with the level to which the horses are tamed? Not sure…

The summer of rain (2018)

I’ve lived in Richmond for 16 years now, and this past summer has certainly been the wettest one to date. The month of June saw a total of 13.32 inches of rain (normally an average of 3.94 inches). It seemed to have rained pretty all summer. We were lucky in Virginia to have avoided the heart of hurricane Florence that wrecked havoc in the carolinas. The hurricane did spawn several tornados that made their way through Richmond, causing significant damage and killing one person. There is no denying, that our climate is in flux. Each year, the temperatures are hotter, the storms stronger and the atmosphere more volatile. While mulling about climate change in the rainforest that is our backyard,  I stumbled across a surprise from last year’s planting. Fresh raspberries that somehow found enough sunlight to bloom…..

Here’s to a better autumn!