An early snow

December 9, 2018 – We were hit with an early and unexpected snowstorm, accumulating over 13 inches in Richmond, Virginia. This is certainly an early start to the snow season for us and much heavier than in the past. After a review of the Richmond weather records dating back to 1897, the heaviest snow that occurred earlier than Dec 10 was 7.3 inches on Nov 6-7, 1953. The record for December snowstorm for Richmond was 17.2 inches on Dec 22-23, 1908. Stay safe out there.

Patagonian horses

I’ve always liked this photo for some reason. Even though the framing of the shot is not perfect, I still like the landscape painted by the different colors of horses. I took this photo back in 2016 in Patagonia (Chilean side). I noticed that the horse manes are cut to different lengths. I speculate that this has to do with the level to which the horses are tamed? Not sure…

The summer of rain (2018)

I’ve lived in Richmond for 16 years now, and this past summer has certainly been the wettest one to date. The month of June saw a total of 13.32 inches of rain (normally an average of 3.94 inches). It seemed to have rained pretty all summer. We were lucky in Virginia to have avoided the heart of hurricane Florence that wrecked havoc in the carolinas. The hurricane did spawn several tornados that made their way through Richmond, causing significant damage and killing one person. There is no denying, that our climate is in flux. Each year, the temperatures are hotter, the storms stronger and the atmosphere more volatile. While mulling about climate change in the rainforest that is our backyard,  I stumbled across a surprise from last year’s planting. Fresh raspberries that somehow found enough sunlight to bloom…..

Here’s to a better autumn!

Tanyard Landing Trail, Gloucester (blueways), VA

Tanyard Landing Trail map. Dolphins can be spotted as you head out closer to Morris Bay and towards the larger York River, although these bigger waters are more suitable for kayaks.

On an unseasonably mild summer, August day, we headed east to the coastal plains (tidewater) region of Virginia. With the predicted forecast of highs of 82F with some overcast, we knew this was the perfect time to further explore the beautiful blueways in gloucester county. We had previously completed two of the blueways (Warehouse Landing & John’s Point) and decided to take on our third – Tanyard Landing Trail in Gloucester, Virginia. 

Located just an hour away from richmond, this trail follows the gentle poropotank river, a small tributary of the York River. As a blueway, this trail is designed for non-motorized boats, such as canoes and kayaks. It is a great place to experience a small piece of the huge Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The wildlife is abundant, with blue herons, bald eagles, kingfishers, crabs, and even dolphins have been spotted in the poropotank river. It was a perfect day to flow through the arteries that make up the Chesapeake Bay. The occasional clouds, helped shade us from the summer sun and welcoming breeze, flowed through us. The air was fresh, with just a hint of salt. The bay grasses were healthy and plentiful. These are the buffer zones that are so important in keeping the bay clean. We meandered down the peaceful river in complete silence. The occasional fish would jump from the water, but otherwise, the only other sound was the wind through the grasses.

Checking out the healthy bay grasses
3 person canoe

When you first arrive at the Tanyard Landing Boat Ramp,  you will have the option of either going west down the trail or east to explore the river upstream. We actually did not stay on the trail, but headed east to explore the inner wetland areas. We spotted one other group kayaking but no one else was on the water. After the day of paddling, we headed to the nearby Gloucester village, a peaceful and quiet town with a population of 2951. The busiest section of town is the main street  where most of the shops and restaurants are located. We returned to Olivia’s, our favorite restaurant in town, for crab cakes. For anyone looking for the complete, Virginia tidewater region experience: find a canoe/kayak, pick a blueway to explore, and then stop for food in Gloucester village. It’s what summer is Virginia is all about.

Gloucester village

Help save the Chesapeake Bay here: Chesapeake Bay Foundation

John’s Point (Gloucester Blueways), Gloucester VA

“There is but one entrance by sea into this country, and that is at the mouth of a very goodly bay, 18 or 20 miles broad. The cape on the south is called Cape Henry, in honor of our most noble Prince. The land, white hilly sands like unto the Downs, and all along the shores rest plety of pines and firs … Within is a country that may have the prerogative over the most pleasant places known, for large and pleasant navigable rivers, heaven and earth never agreed better to frame a place for man’s habitation.” – Captain John Smith (regarding his exploration of the Chesapeake Bay in 1608)

beach combing for shells and oysters

In one of his most well-known passages describing the Chesapeake bay, Captain John Smith’s words still resonate today. This is the largest estuary in the United States and home to an incredible ecosystem. There is no question that the a healthy bay benefits everyone, from a environmental and wildlife standpoint and of course economically. Unfortunately, not everyone shares this sentiment. The future of the bay is uncertain as a proposed budget, by President Trump would eliminate federal funding for the continuing cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay. The Environmental Protection Agency budget  for the Chesapeake cleanup was $73 million. With the new bill proposed, this amount would be $0. Organizations like The Chesapeake Bay Foundation have been fighting the battle to restore the bay for many years. Click here to sign a petition to urge congress to preserve funding for the bay: http://takeaction.cbf.org

I used this golden spring weekend, to pull out the canoe from the basement and explore another part of the Chesapeake Bay and the Gloucester Blueways, this time, to John’s Point. We paddled the Ware River last year, but wanted to explore another of the 5 total blueways that exist in Gloucester County. John’s Point is very similar to Warehouse landing, the boat launch is very well kept with a nice clean beach as your launch site. It was a windy day, and the proposed trail totaled 8.8 miles along the Severn River toward Mobjack Bay and back was formidable. This might have been possible in a kayak, but we opted to head west instead of east to explore the inner waterways and the beaches in search of crabs and oysters. We took breaks from the wind as we hopped from island to island, and combed our way through the beaches. We saw several ospreys, one egret, one loon and a red tailed hawk. The water was very clear and all along the beach were oysters popping out of the sand. I came out here to feel once again how special the Chesapeake Bay is. What John Smith said about the bay in 1608, still holds today. It is truly a national treasure worth fighting to protect for future generations to come.

Map of John’s Point (8.8 mile loop), from http://www.gloucesterva.info

Help save the Chesapeake Bay here: Chesapeake Bay Foundation