Happy National Canoe Day

June 26, 2021 was national canoe day in Canada. I guess it was meant to be, because this weekend we finally took the first steps into restoring an OLD and beat up Old town wood canvas canoe that has been sitting at my parents lot for years. I honestly don’t even know if it is possible to restore it, but I’m going to give it a shot. This particular canoe, has been sitting out in the bare elements for over 3 years……a decent wind could take off all the canvas. It looked as if wasps had ants had been residents in this canoe at some point. We all stripped the canvas and strapped her in the car and brought her home.

I was surprised to see that the heart of the canoe….the ribs were all still in decent shape. Meaning, it had a shape. I plan to pick at this project over the next year until it’s done. No timeline, but just work as we go. After this weekend, at least I’ll know it’s condition can only improve. I need to build some canoe cradles pronto and let her settle in. I still have to set up a new workshop somehow along the way. Much to be done, but it’ll be a labor of love. Happy paddling to all.

Pine Needle Tea

A cloudy and muggy, Saturday kept us mostly indoors. The kids were both with stuffy, and runny noses. A mild cold was here to stay for the next few days.

I told my son that during these times, the perfect remedy was something we could easily concoct in our backyard…pine needle tea.

Ingredients:

  • eastern white pine needles (about half a handful)
  • honey (optional)
  • milk (optional)

A very simple brew that can be made on virtually any canoe trip, pine needle tea has so much to offer. It is loaded with vitamin c and A as well as anti-oxidative properties. While it can be made with several different types of pine trees, I think the classic pine needle tea is usually with eastern white pine. This tree can be easily identified from yellow pine by the fact that the needle clusters grow in clumps of five. A good way to remember this is that the letter “W” for white, has 5 points in it. (A pretty useful mneumonic). *whenever you are consuming plants or trees outside, please make sure you know exactly how to identify the species you are dealing with. There are several types of conifers, such as yew that is not suitable for consumption. Also, pine needle tree should not be consumed that anyone bearing children.

Once you have identified the proper needles, you can wash them to get off any dirt or bugs. You can cut the needles into smaller pieces or leave them whole. I generally do not boil the needles. I heat the water to the point before boiling as to slow the steeping process and not to release too much bitter tannins. The younger pine needles (lighter in color) are generally a little sweeter, although with less ascorbic acid (vitamin C). The darker, older needles contain more vitamin C but are more bitter. I generally let the tea steep for about 15 minutes. You can mix in a little honey or milk if you wish. In no time at all, you’ve got a warm, healing drink from your backyard that should help you get over your cold.

While we are no longer worried about vitamin C deficiency and scurvy in this part of the world, this trusty and simple pine needle tea recipe will hopefully serve you well.

Have fun everyone!

*Be careful once again when identifying trees and plants of all kind!

Growing oysters in the Chesapeake Bay

In 1608, John Smith described the Chesapeake Bay as a bountiful body of water in his journals: “a country that may have the prerogative over the most pleasant places known, for large and pleasant navigable rivers, heaven and earth never agreed better to frame a place for man’s habitation“.  The water seemed full to the brim with white salmon (rockfish aka stripped bass), bluecrabs, porpoises, and of course the oyster. He described the large beds of “oysters that lay as thick as stones”.  The oyster population was so abundant that the oyster reefs neared surfaces and became navigable hazards.

In 2021, the state of the bay is certainly different. The oyster population has been decimated due to over-fishing, polution and diseases. It is estimated that in the year 2011, the oyster population in the upper Chesapeake Bay was 0.3% of the population levels of the early 1800s.

Of late, many conservation efforts have pushed towards oyster repopulation as one of the main ways to fight pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. As filter feeders, oysters are capable of filtering over 1 gallon of water an hour. As they purify the water, this allow sunlight to penetrate the water and to grow bay grasses, this in turns provide habitats for the blue crabs and fish. As such, the oyster plays a critical role in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem.

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I have always been interested in growing oysters and raising them. With the help of a friend of mine, we were able to get a small farm going. He has been doing this for several years and has several floats, with hundreds of oysters at different stages of life. It takes approximately 1.5 years to raise an oyster that is large enough for eating (approximately 2.5 inches). You can buy oysters as “spat”, this is the term used to call oysters larvae that are mature enough to latch onto another surface. You could typically buy 1000 of them for around 70 dollars.

There really is not much to tending to oysters. They just need water and room to grow. Every 6 months, they will need to be moved into a larger meshed bag, until eventually they are large enough to sit in an oyster cage. In the meantime, you can just hose them off occasionally and clean the cages of barnacles. My eventual goal will be to see if we re-establish a wild population once again, without cages. This is one small step though towards that direction. Long live the Chesapeake bay.

Bluebird’s Welcome

We recently settled into our new home in a part of town that we are really quite unfamiliar with. The new location certainly brings us closer to nature. Similar to our old neighborhood, there are plenty of trees and wildlife all around us. The bluebirds were the first to welcome us to the neighborhood, it appears that there may be two that nest in the wooded area behind us. There is much to explore, and the small forest has kept the kids occupied as they discover new birds, flora, lizards and mammals. A small herd of deer frequently pass through the back along the stream that meanders after a heavy rain storm. We’ve had one sighting of a red fox in our backyard, but he has yet to show himself since. As the last of the dogwood petals begin to fall, we know that the start of summer is just around the corner. We’ve been blessed with another consecutive year of a fair weathered Spring. There are many trees to plant, a workshop to set up and wood canvas canoe to restore. Hope everyone is safe and healthy.

Spring 2021

It’s hard to believe it’s been over one year since we initially went into lockdown to blunt the COVID-19 pandemic. This winter felt especially long, and with the temperatures warming up and flowers in bloom, the ushering of Spring was extra sweet this year. With the vaccine roll-out gaining momentum in the country, hope is in the air. Be safe out there everyone.

Winter hike on Beaver Lake

It is hard to believe that the COVID-19 pandemic has raged on for more than 10 months in the United States. As the cold winter days settle in, there is no sign that this virus letting up either. As the air becomes drier and people are forced to spend more time indoors, the number of cases have skyrocketed. Hope arrived several weeks ago, with the first vaccinations administered to health care workers – our first solid foothold in this war. I was fortunate enough to get the first of the two part vaccinations, 3 weeks ago at my hospital. My reaction was similar to my flu vaccinations, I had mild chills for a couple days but otherwise bounced back quickly.

As I reflect on the past 10 months, there is no doubt this has been a difficult time for everyone in the world. During this trying time, it is no surprise to me that this pandemic has also taken a toll on mental health. Families and friends are separated and the feeling of loneliness and anxiety can naturally settle in. Everyone has their own way of finding center, of recharging and being uplifted. For myself, it has always been the outdoors.

In the winter, getting outside has its obstacles. But there’s no such thing as bad weather, just bad gear. For us, getting outside is a priority and to let the kids run and explore new lands. Everything is a little slower in the winter, so we prepared for that – waking up just a little earlier, bundling up on more layers and packing the right food and snacks.

Our closest state park is the good ol’ dependable Pocahontas State Park. We wanted to hike the Beaver Lake Trail once again. The last time we took on this short 2.4 mile hike was in the summer of 2019.  In the afternoon, it was going to reach a high of 46F with plenty of sun. I was surprised at how quiet the trails actually were. Breathing in the crisp, cool air while hiking under towering white oaks and sycamore trees was something that I missed. The trail certainly looked different without the foliage. It definitely sounded different, the chirping of birds cut through the bare forest, the snaps of twigs and sticks under our feet seemed to echo just a little louder.

It all felt good. The gentle wind on the face, the  slight chill through the body, the movement of muscles, the sunlight, and the calming sight of a bare lake in the winter made everyone feel better.

Whatever it is that gets you to center, I hope you get to do more of it. Don’t forget to check on family and friends that might be more prone to loneliness or depression, a phone call or video chat goes a long way these days. I hope everyone stays healthy and safe. Vaccines are on the way. We shall prevail.