Chesapeake Bay Oysters – The First Harvest

After almost 2 years of growing, my son and I were excited to harvest our first bag of Chesapeake Bay (Eastern/Virginian) oysters. It has been several months since our last check on the float, we found the whole thing was actually submerged due to the weight of the now much heftier oysters. This was really not an issue, as the oysters were protected in a cage. When we initially placed these guys in their cage, they were called “spat” not much larger than big sunflower seeds. After 2 years of filtering the brackish waters of the bay, several of these guys were actually larger than 4 inches! This was our first growth cycle, and it has certainly been an interesting and fun experience.

April 2022

While we sat around the grill preparing a feast, we reflected on what we have learned:

  1. Raising oysters is very easy. If you have a sturdy oyster float, and access to the water, you can raise oysters. They really don’t require much. They simply need to be upsized into bigger bags and cages and they grow. This is usually done every several months. If you also want to keep them separated and growing beautifully, shake and jostle them around in the bags so that they don’t grow to one another. This will also cut down on barnacle growth. Hosing them down every once in a while, will also keep algae off and keep them in better shape for harvesting and bringing to the table.
  2. The spat is not expensive: $35 can buy you a bag of 1000 oyster spat.
  3. 1 oyster can filter 50 gallons of water in one day. This is why they are essential animals in the battle of cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay.
  4. The “R” rule doesn’t necessarily pertain to these types of oysters (triploid, sterile) . Seafood enthusiasts have always followed the “R” rule when it came to eating wild caught (diploid) oysters: “Eat wild caught oysters only during the months with the letter “R” in it.” There are two reasons for this rule.
    1. Food safety: eating raw shellfish, always carries the risk of food borne illness from bacteria such as vibriosis (caused by the bacteria vibrio vulnificus). The risk of contracting this illness is higher during the summer months when the water is warmer. The reality is that this illness can be contracted from eating raw shellfish during ANY time of the year. It is more prevalent during the warmer weather however due to more favorable conditions for the bacteria to proliferate. Properly cooking your oysters can virtually eliminate the risk of catching this infection. The CDC estimates that approximately 80,000 people get vibrio infections each year and 100 people die from it each year in the United States. I always eat my oysters cooked.
    2. Taste: Wild oysters are diploid organisms, meaning they carry a set of chromosomes from each parent. Farm raised oysters for the most part have been selected and altered to be triploid, meaning they actually carry an extra set of chromosomes. These oysters are sterile and do not reproduce. During the warm summer months is when wild oysters are active in the reproduction cycle. During this time, the oysters under go physiologic changes which alters their taste. They are more watery, bitter and just not tasty. Many of the restaurants that serve oysters year round, serve farm raised, triploid oysters. Triploid oysters grow faster because they do not go through the reproductive cycle. All o their energy is put towards getting larger. They grow to bigger sizes and they maintain their taste throughout the year.
  5. Oysters are highly nutritious!
  6. Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) nutrition facts per 3.5 oz serving. (Approx 3 oysters)
  • Calories: 79.
  • Protein: 9 grams.
  • Carbs: 4 grams.
  • Fat: 3 grams.
  • Zinc: 555% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Vitamin B12: 538% of the DV.
  • Copper: 493% of the DV.
  • Selenium: 56% of the DV.

7. Be safe when shucking oysters. Wear proper gloves when handling the cages and the oysters as their shells can be razor sharp.

Be safe and have fun.

Fishing Bay, Chesapeake Bay. Fall 2021

3 thoughts on “Chesapeake Bay Oysters – The First Harvest

  1. And thank you for your fun facts – I knew about the bacterial risks, but not about the changes in taste, or the massive nutritional benefits. Guess I should eat more oysters!!

    Like

  2. fantastic, fascinating, and informative. came across the blog years ago and try to keep up. this one particular hit home given the environmental engagement and, personally, the food safety aspect (having dealt with a nasty round of campylobacter jejuni induced food poisoning leading to an acute bout of reactive arthritis). we live in lexington va (on the chessie trail/maury river) and try to enjoy the great outdoors as often as possible as well with my wife and three sons, so further resonation of your posts ensues. tks for sharing, keep up the good work and warmest wishes from lexington, kevin et al.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s